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Journal of Micropalaeontology An open-access journal of The Micropalaeontological Society
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Volume 3, issue 1
J. Micropalaeontol., 3, 2, 1984
https://doi.org/10.1144/jm.3.1.11
© Author(s) 1984. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
J. Micropalaeontol., 3, 2, 1984
https://doi.org/10.1144/jm.3.1.11
© Author(s) 1984. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  01 Mar 1984

01 Mar 1984

Some geometrical aspects of fusiform planispiral shape in larger foraminifera

Martin D. Brasier Martin D. Brasier
  • Department of Geology, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull HU6 7RX, England

Abstract. Fusiform planispiral tests are found in many lineages of larger foraminifera (e.g. fusulinids, lituolids, alveolinids, soritids, amphisteginids) in which a general trend from spherical or discoidal to elongate test shape has often been noted. Geometrical models are used to illustrate an increasing surface area and the shortened spiral lines of communication of such a trend, with whorl and chamber proportions and volume or spiral length held constant. The suggestion that fusiform planispiral growth is a device to shorten lines of communication from the proloculus to the poles is questioned.

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