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Journal of Micropalaeontology An open-access journal of The Micropalaeontological Society
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Short summary
Current climate and environmental changes strongly affect shallow marine and coastal areas like the Baltic Sea. The combination of foraminiferal geochemistry and environmental parameters demonstrates that in a highly variable setting like the Baltic Sea, it is possible to separate different environmental impacts on the foraminiferal assemblages and therefore use chemical factors to reconstruct how seawater temperature, salinity, and oxygen varied in the past and may vary in the future.
JM | Articles | Volume 37, issue 2
J. Micropalaeontol., 37, 403–429, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/jm-37-403-2018
J. Micropalaeontol., 37, 403–429, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/jm-37-403-2018

Research article 07 Sep 2018

Research article | 07 Sep 2018

Assessing proxy signatures of temperature, salinity, and hypoxia in the Baltic Sea through foraminifera-based geochemistry and faunal assemblages

Jeroen Groeneveld et al.

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Short summary
Current climate and environmental changes strongly affect shallow marine and coastal areas like the Baltic Sea. The combination of foraminiferal geochemistry and environmental parameters demonstrates that in a highly variable setting like the Baltic Sea, it is possible to separate different environmental impacts on the foraminiferal assemblages and therefore use chemical factors to reconstruct how seawater temperature, salinity, and oxygen varied in the past and may vary in the future.
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